Implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Guidelines on Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) and determining whether processing is “likely to result in a high risk” for the purposes of Regulation 2016/679

DPIAs are a useful way for data controllers to implement data processing systems that comply with the GDPR and can be mandatory for some types of processings. They are scalable and can take different forms, but the GDPR sets out the basic requirements of an effective DPIA. Data controllers should see the carrying out of a DPIA as a useful and positive activity that aids legal compliance.
Article 24(1) sets out the basic responsibility of the controller in terms of complying with the GDPR: “taking into account the nature, scope, context and purposes of processing as well as the risks of varying likelihood and severity for the rights and freedoms of natural persons, the controller shall implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure and to be able to demonstrate that processing is performed in accordance with this Regulation. Those measures shall be reviewed and updated where necessary”.
The DPIA is a key part of complying with the Regulation where high risk data processing is planned or is taking place. This means that data controllers should use the criteria set out in this document to determine whether or not a DPIA has to be carried out. Internal data controller policy could extend this list beyond the GDPR’s legal requirements. This should result in greater trust and confidence of data subjects and other data controllers.
Where a likely high risk processing is planned, the data controller must:
– choose a DPIA methodology (examples given in Annex 1) that satisfies the criteria in Annex 2, or specify and implement a systematic DPIA process that:
o is compliant with the criteria in Annex 2;
o is integrated into existing design, development, change, risk and operational review processes in accordance with internal processes, context and culture;
o involves the appropriate interested parties and define their responsibilities clearly (controller, DPO, data subjects or their representatives, business, technical services, processors, information security officer, etc.);
– provide the DPIA report to the competent supervisory authority when required to do so;
– consult the supervisory authority when they have failed to determine sufficient measures to mitigate the high risks;
– periodically review the DPIA and the processing it assesses, at least when there is a change of the risk posed by processing the operation;
– document the decisions taken.

Guidelines on Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) – Draft

Guidelines on the right to data portability

Article 20 of the GDPR creates a new right to data portability, which is closely related to but differs from the right of access in many ways. It allows for data subjects to receive the personal data, which they have provided to a controller, in a structured, commonly used and machine-readable format, and to transmit them to another data controller. The purpose of this new right is to empower the data subject and give him/her more control over the personal data concerning him or her.
Since it allows the direct transmission of personal data from one data controller to another, the right to data portability is also an important tool that will support the free flow of personal data in the EU and foster competition between controllers. It will facilitate switching between different service providers, and will therefore foster the development of new services in the context of the digital single market strategy.
This opinion provides guidance on the way to interpret and implement the right to data portability as introduced by the GDPR. It aims at discussing the right to data portability and its scope. It clarifies the conditions under which this new right applies taking into account the legal basis of the data processing (either the data subject’s consent or the necessity to perform a contract) and the fact that this right is limited to personal data provided by the data subject. The opinion also provides concrete examples and criteria to explain the circumstances in which this right applies. In this regard, WP29 considers that the right to data portability covers data provided knowingly and actively by the data subject as well as the personal data generated by his or her activity. This new right cannot be undermined and limited to the personal information directly communicated by the data subject, for example, on an online form.
As a good practice, data controllers should start developing the means that will contribute to answer data portability requests, such as download tools and Application Programming Interfaces. They should guarantee that personal data are transmitted in a structured, commonly used and machine-readable format, and they should be encouraged to ensure the interoperability of the data format provided in the exercise of a data portability request.
The opinion also helps data controllers to clearly understand their respective obligations and recommends best practices and tools that support compliance with the right to data portability. Finally, the opinion recommends that industry stakeholders and trade associations work together on a common set of interoperable standards and formats to deliver the requirements of the right to data portability.

Draft – Article 29 Working Party – Guidelines on the right to data portability

Adopted guidelines – Guidelines on the right to data portability

Guidelines on Data Protection Officers (‘DPOs’)

Under the GDPR, it is mandatory for certain controllers and processors to designate a DPO.2 This will be the case for all public authorities and bodies (irrespective of what data they process), and for other organisations that – as a core activity – monitor individuals systematically and on a large scale, or that process special categories of personal data on a large scale.
Even when the GDPR does not specifically require the appointment of a DPO, organisations may sometimes find it useful to designate a DPO on a voluntary basis. The Article 29 Data Protection Working Party (‘WP29’) encourages these voluntary efforts.
The concept of DPO is not new. Although Directive 95/46/EC3 did not require any organisation to appoint a DPO, the practice of appointing a DPO has nevertheless developed in several Member States over the years.
Before the adoption of the GDPR, the WP29 argued that the DPO is a cornerstone of accountability and that appointing a DPO can facilitate compliance and furthermore, become a competitive advantage for businesses.4 In addition to facilitating compliance through the implementation of accountability tools (such as facilitating or carrying out data protection impact assessments and audits), DPOs act as intermediaries between relevant stakeholders (e.g. supervisory authorities, data subjects, and business units within an organisation).
DPOs are not personally responsible in case of non-compliance with the GDPR. The GDPR makes it clear that it is the controller or the processor who is required to ensure and to be able to demonstrate that the processing is performed in accordance with its provisions (Article 24(1)). Data protection compliance is a responsibility of the controller or the processor.
The controller or the processor also has a crucial role in enabling the effective performance of the DPO’s tasks. Appointing a DPO is a first step but DPOs must also be given sufficient autonomy and resources to carry out their tasks effectively.
The GDPR recognises the DPO as a key player in the new data governance system and lays down conditions for his or her appointment, position and tasks. The aim of these guidelines is to clarify the relevant provisions in the GDPR in order to help controllers and processors to comply with the law, but also to assist DPOs in their role. The guidelines also provide best practice recommendations, building on the experience gained in some EU Member States. The WP29 will monitor the implementation of these guidelines and may complement them with further details as appropriate.

Article 29 Working Party – Guidelines on Data Protection Officers

Adopted guidelines – Guidelines on Data Protection Officers (‘DPOs_)

Guidelines for identifying a controller or processor’s lead supervisory authority

Identifying a lead supervisory authority is only relevant where a controller or processor is carrying out the cross-border processing of personal data. Article 4(23) of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) defines ‘cross-border processing’ as either the:
– processing of personal data which takes place in the context of the activities of establishments in more than one Member State of a controller or processor in the Union where the controller or processor is established in more than one Member State; or
– processing of personal data which takes place in the context of the activities of a single establishment of a controller or processor in the Union but which substantially affects or is likely to substantially affect data subjects in more than one Member State.
This means that where an organisation has establishments in France and Romania, for example, and the processing of personal data takes place in the context of their activities, then this will constitute cross-border processing.
Alternatively, the organisation may only carry out processing activity in the context of its establishment in France. However, if the activity substantially affects – or is likely to substantially affect – data subjects in France and Romania then this will also constitute cross-border processing.

Article 29 Working Party – Guidelines for identifying a controller or processor’s lead supervisory authority

Adopted guidelines – Guidelines for identifying a controller or processor_s lead supervisory authority

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s